ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya! ucbcomedy:


Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya!

ucbcomedy:

Words of wisdom from Amy Poehler

A daily dose of Poehler wisdom coming atchya!

(via tuesdayswithigor)

christel-thoughts:

Blue during “Flawless”

that’s it. i’m done. i’m such of fan of this child.

LOOK AT HER EMULATING HER MOMMY

(via wordsandturds)

sitcorn:

hey remember that law i forget exactly how it goes but its something along the lines of ‘if you murder someone you go to jail’ whatever happened to that? is that still a thing

(via molegan)

foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
foxmouth:


Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
“Years ago I learned a very cool thing about Robin Williams, and I couldn’t watch a movie of his afterward without thinking of it. I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider. For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event, anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements. You can learn a lot about a person from their rider. This is where rocks bands list their requirement for green M&Ms (which is actually a surprisingly smart thing to do). This is also where a famous environmentalist requires a large gas-guzzling private jet to fly to the event city, but then requires an electric or hybrid car to take said environmentalist to the event venue when in view of the public.
When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found. He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work. I never watched a Robin Williams movie the same way after that. I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back. I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact. Let’s hope that impact lives on without him. Thanks, Robin Williams- not just for laughs, but also for a cool example.”
— Brian Lord.org  (via boysncroptops)

(via molegan)

arabellesicardi:

rpattz ALS challenge video is my favorite because it’s the worst. so, basically, in character and totally predictable.  

(via sealcat)

kois0:

is tesco feeling ok 
kois0:

is tesco feeling ok 

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

GO THE FUCK OFFFF

(via thagal)

(via colbornes)